Process Chemistry and Laboratory Analysis

Process Chemistry and Laboratory Analysis
Equipment reduces odors and energy costs

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Equipment reduces odors and energy costs

Problem

Strong odors emanated from the Martinsville (Va.) Wastewater Treatment Plant, affecting nearby tourist venues.

Solution

Operators installed two 1,200 mm Hy-Pack filter presses from Beckart Environmental to dewater and compact biosolids, and a single-stage Aqua3000 chlorine dioxide generator (also Beckart) at the headworks to mitigate odors.

Biosolids costs went from $320,000 to $160,000 annually. By eliminating two 200 hp blowers, the plant saved $180,000 annually in electric bills. 262/656-7680; www.beckart.com.

Surfactant reduces chemical oxygen demand

Problem

A chemical manufacturing plant in the northern Midwest had 4,000 to 10,000 mg/L of COD in its discharge water. The local wastewater treatment facility levied surcharges to treat the excess loading. Chemical plant management wanted to reduce the surcharges.

Solution

Management selected a bioaugmentation program, adding a 0.5 kg pouch of BCP10 surfactant from Bionetix International to the wastewater system every day for three days, then one pouch every week for the rest of a six-week treatment period. COD decreased to 2,600 mg/L and TSS also declined significantly. The chemical plant meets discharge levels and no longer pays surcharges. 514/457-2914; www.bionetix.ca.

Chelating detergent cleans membranes

Problem

DTE Tonawanda Wastewater Treatment Plant in Buffalo, N.Y., used caustic soda followed by a citric acid wash to clean membranes in its ultrafiltration system. Results were less than acceptable even after three or four wash cycles.

Solution

The plant manager switched to Micro-90 concentrated alkaline cleaning solution from International Products Corp. A 1 percent solution of the nonhazardous, water-based detergent removed the organics and metals blinding the membranes and eliminated the two-step cleaning process.

The plant achieves 100 percent recovery after every wash and has not replaced the membranes in nine years. 609/386-8770; www.ipcol.com.

Nitrate method eliminates hazardous waste

Problem

The laboratory at Upper Blackstone Water Pollution Abatement District in Millbury, Mass., wanted to reduce hazardous waste from testing and perform nitrate analysis more efficiently.

Solution

The laboratory implemented the U.S. EPA-approved one-reagent nitrate method from Systea Scientific. The nonhazardous, non-enzymatic reducing agent minimized or eliminated poor recovery and matrix interference problems. Greater method sensitivity and linear range enabled high- and low-range samples to be performed together.

The method protected personnel and the environment, while eliminating hazardous waste generation and enabling the laboratory to exceed new EPA-testing requirements. 630/645-0600; www.systeascientific.com.



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