Vogelsang’s In-Line Grinder Saves Wear And Tear And Maintenance

Vogelsang’s In-Line Grinder Saves Wear And Tear And Maintenance
Mike Colbert, left, discusses the RotaCut Inline grinder with WWETT Show attendees. The grinder’s Auto Cut Control (ACC) function uses a hydraulic unit to monitor and correct the tension between the blade assembly and cutting screen, optimizing cutting performance and wear component life.

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The “flushables” problem isn’t going away. Hundreds of hygiene products claim to be safe to flush but often clog pipes and equipment, leading to high maintenance costs. The RotaCut Inline Grinder, displayed in the Vogelsang booth at the 2015 Water & Wastewater Equipment, Treatment & Transport (WWETT) Show, offers a solution.

Solids such as plastic fragments, rubber, hair, wipes, applicators, plastic pens, string, wood and bones are drawn through the cutting screen and cut by self-sharpening rotary blades to a size that can pass through downstream equipment. “This product was designed to grind up rags for treatment facilities,” says Mike Colbert, product and field service manager. “It’s actually a product that we’ve been selling since 1998, but a lot of upgrades have made it more user-friendly.”

Features include AutoReverse, Auto Cut Control (ACC) and reversible cutter screens. The unit is rebuildable inline; cutter cartridges need not be sent out for reconditioning. When placed on the suction or discharge side of a pump, the device helps to eliminate ragging, reduce solids and protect downstream equipment from clogging. It helps prevent damage to belt and plate-and-frame presses, and helps efficiently balance centrifuge feed. Heavy solids are captured in a collection basin and eliminated from the liquid.

AutoReverse helps handle large objects, reversing blade rotation until the object is cleared, reduced and passed through the screen. It engages at preset intervals, keeping blade wear even. The trailing edge of the blade is sharpened as a natural effect of cutting. When the rotation is reversed, a fresh edge enhances the cutting quality.

To maximize blade life, the ACC automatically adjusts the blades as normal wear progresses. It eliminates manual maintenance of the cutting-head tension. The entire process is controlled externally, minimizing the need to open the unit. “Constant pressure on the blade leads to optimum cutting,” says Colbert.

Maintenance can be performed inline without removing any connected piping. The hinged cutting head can be accessed by disengaging one or more hand latches. The head is disassembled by removing the Allen bolt that holds the assembly together, allowing routine service such as blade or screen changes to be performed quickly.

Screens come in several patterns that produce a designated particle size  that will pass through downstream machinery. The rotational speed of the cutting head also influences the solid size. All screens are reversible to allow for a fresh cutting surface without buying new parts.

The device is used in applications including primary and secondary sludge, sludge transfer, and dewatering feed. According to Colbert, the ability to specify how fine the particles are shredded is convenient for wastewater operators. “All plants have varied specifications regarding how small the particles need to be to get through the rotating equipment without clogging it,” he says.

Colbert was enthused by the response from WWETT 2015 attendees; he talked with “many more” plant operators than in the past. “I think changing the name played a big role, as I saw more people on the municipal wastewater side than ever,” he says.

Vogelsang plans to come back with an expanded offering in 2016, including products geared toward small treatment systems. “This show brings people from all over, with a lot of interest in the industry,” he says. “We’re hearing a lot of feedback that we can bring back and use in the future.” 800/984-9400; www.vogelsangusa.com.



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