In this week's water and wastewater news, a water operator from Wisconsin is lucky to be alive after a nail-gun mishap; and a wastewater worker is killed in a motorcycle crash on plant grounds


An operator from the village of Lena (Wisconsin) water plant recently drove himself to the hospital after accidentally shooting a nail into his heart.

Doug Bergeson had been working on framing a fireplace in his home when the nail gun fired and sent a 3.5-inch nail ricocheting into his torso.

“I thought it just nicked me,” he told the Associated Press. “I looked down. I couldn’t see anything. I felt OK. I wasn’t worried about the injury. I couldn’t feel any pressure or blood building up.”

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But once he started pulling at his sweatshirt, he realized he could only see a small portion of the nail, and that the rest of it was in his heart.

“I could see the nail moving with my heartbeat,” Bergeson told the Associated Press. “It was kind of twitching with every heartbeat.”

After driving to the local hospital, Bergeson was taken by ambulance to Aurora Baycare Medical Center in Green Bay, where he spent two days. He’s fine now, and ready to get back to work for the village of Lena.

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Source: Herald Net

Wastewater Worker Killed on Plant Grounds in Motorcycle Crash

A wastewater worker was killed in a motorcycle crash at the Bay View (Ohio) Wastewater Treatment Plant.

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Michael Lammie had just finished his shift and was traveling on his motorcycle at a high rate of speed when he lifted the front wheel. As the wheel came down, he lost control and crashed. Lammie wasn’t wearing a helmet.

Source: The Blade

Texas Utility Could Lose Operating Permit

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A wastewater utility in Trophy Club, Texas, could lose its operating permit because it has received too many violation notices from the state over the past six years.

There’s an administrative hearing slated for next month which will decide the fate of Trophy Club Municipal Utility District No. 1.

While some local residents are saying the utility is being managed poorly, wastewater officials counter that they’ve already fixed the problems that caused those violations.

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The district also is planning a significant treatment plant expansion.

Source: US News

Florida Announces $50 Million in Springs Restoration Funding

Florida Gov. Rick Scott recently announced the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and the Florida Water Management Districts have identified 40 springs projects that will receive $50 million as part of the 2017-18 Fighting for Florida’s Future budget.

The $50 million in Legacy Florida funding for springs restoration projects was included in Governor Scott’s recommended budget and approved by the legislature during this year’s legislative session. These projects will help improve water quality, recharge water flow and protect habitat in Florida’s iconic spring systems.

“Florida is home to some of the most beautiful springs in the world, and protecting these natural treasures is incredibly important for our state’s families, environment and economy,” said Scott. “Last year, I was proud to sign the Legacy Florida bill to establish a dedicated funding source for springs protection and I am glad that investment is continuing with $50 million for springs restoration projects across the state this year.”

DEP Secretary Noah Valenstein thanked the governor and the state legislature for securing a dedicated funding source for springs restoration and protection. “We can continue to focus on completing strategic acquisitions and projects that will produce real benefits for our spring systems,” he said. “I look forward to continuing to work with the governor and legislature, the water management districts and partners in the environmental, agricultural and local communities to conserve and protect Florida’s iconic springs.”

Source: Florida DEP


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