Proxitane WW-12 disinfectant from Solvay Chemicals


Proxitane WW-12 disinfectant from Solvay Chemicals is based on environmentally compatible peracetic acid (PAA) and hydrogen peroxide for biological control in municipal wastewater. "It can be used like sodium hypochlorite (bleach), but without the chlorinated byproducts," says John Maziuk, technical marketing manager. "Instead, you'll get small amounts of acetic acid, water and oxygen."

The ready-to-use liquid controls fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci, total coliforms and E. coli. It has no adverse effects on TDS, TSS and pH. It also can be used to increase the capacity of undersized UV systems and does not require a dechlorination step. The EPA-registered disinfectant, an alternative to halogenated disinfectants, also can have synergistic effects on existing UV disinfection systems.

"I'm a chemical engineer and I like to see minor improvements put together to make the whole process much better than before," Maziuk says. "Quite a bit of work has been done in a number of UV systems in Europe, and now we're starting to do studies in the United States."

Related: Odor Control and Disinfection

The microbiocide can be used for wet-weather disinfection at CSOs, SSOs and secondary bypasses, as well as to control wastewater odors. Stable under ambient conditions, the disinfectant has a shelf life of about six months. "It also is very stable over wide temperature ranges," Maziuk says.

The Proxitane WW-12 injection system can be used as the primary disinfection system or as a low-energy-demand backup during high flows or peak power demand periods. "The more information we can provide to people who are considering alternatives to chlorine disinfection, the more it helps," Maziuk says. "All we're saying is that there aren't just one or two alternatives — there may be three or four. Not everything is perfect for every particular type of wastewater." 713/525-6800; www.solvaychemicals.us

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